Fight Over Daisy in F. Scott Fitzgerald´s The Great Gatsby Essay

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F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, portrays the pursuit of Daisy as a mere contest between Jay Gatsby and Tom Buchanan. In the plot of the Great Gatsby, the idea of true love during the Jazz Age is defunct, and the social ideals of the American Dream show the aristocratic, materialistic lifestyles of the upper class in society. Tom and Gatsby’s fight for the “golden girl” represents the idea of materialism than true love. Gatsby and Tom’s quarrel for Daisy illustrates their fight over Daisy’s image of success and glamour by showing their economic power than contending for her true love. Throughout the different sources Gatsby uses to attract Daisy, one of them is his luxurious and materialistic spending to gain Daisy’s …show more content…
Gatsby’s car and books symbolize his flamboyance and genuineness. As Gatsby strives for the girl with the “voice full of money” by re-inventing himself, Fitzgerald shows that the class division between West and East Egg is holding Gatsby from beating Tom in his contest for Daisy. The class distinction between old and new money shows that Gatsby’s ideal of reliving the past is just another fantasy. Tom’s drastic measure of having an affair impacts the relationship between him and his wife. Tom’s big, hulking presence shows his supercilious lifestyle, and his hurtful character. Tom’s affair with his mistress, shows his confident, demoralizing nature. During the wedding, while Daisy cries, she says, “Take ’em down-stairs and give ’em back to whoever they belong to. Tell ’em all Daisy’s change’ her mine (76). The pearls that Tom buys Daisy represent his affection for materialistic spending than his wanting for true love. Tom intimidates Daisy with this present, and degrades her by showing that he has an affair, and he can buy her love with pearls. Also this relates to Tom’s car wreck in Santa Barbara, where it is obvious that Tom is an adulterer. Daisy recognizes that Tom is having an affair, but stays with him because he financially supports her, Daisy says to Tom at Gatsby’s party, “and if you want to take down any addresses here’s my little gold pencil. . .

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