Essay on The Furture of the U.S. Education System

862 Words 4 Pages
After much consideration I’d venture to say that three things that we do really well in the U.S. Education System are as follows: our responses to differences in the classroom, the fact that we have a free and accessible public education for all individuals regardless of religion, race, or economic status, and our ability to pursue a higher education. While I trust that as educators we could all benefit from a more extensive training in particular areas-- I do believe it is commendable how well we respond to the varying aspects of our classrooms including: inclusion, multicultural education, multiple intelligences, and differentiated instruction (Sapon-Shevin, 2013).
In my opinion and based largely on experience the top three priorities
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90).
I do believe, whole-heartedly, that schools can make a positive impact on children’s lives regardless of the extenuating factors they face. While it does take a “village to raise a child” and a partnership needs to happen between school and home, I believe that as long as schools begin to do their part than it is a step in the right direction. Lickona (1991) states that early indicators are hopeful when it comes to the effectiveness of the new efforts in values education and that by adopting such programs and attitudes research is showing an increase in the moral attitudes and behaviors of students (p. 27). I imagine that if educators are creating environments where students feel loved, accepted, respected, and safe that we will begin to see an improvement in their behaviors. It is difficult to discipline a child if they do not feel loved and/or respected and once you have established that relationship with them than they will behave accordingly if for no other reason than the fact that you have now given them reason to be their best version of themselves.
I also deem that the future educational system needs to model itself after Finland’s schools and adopt a “whatever it takes” attitude (Hancock, 2011, p. 1). Finland’s schools have a “whatever it takes” attitude, which allows them to hold students back, require additional help to some capacity, etc. It is

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