Wuthering Heights Love Essay example

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Although banned by many, and put on a shelf for many years, Wuthering Heights still delivers the shock value which is anticipated when reading books written in the 1800’s. Daughter of a clergy man, Emily Bronte the nom de plume of the author Ellis Bell, penned Wuthering Heights and left British society in an uproar due to the content within the pages while having touched upon forbidden love, the supernatural, dark passion, incest, race, and women’s rights. Due to the scandalous nature of Wuthering Heights, it was buried for many years and was not praised for its’ brilliant writing until much later by literary critics. Even today, there are some communities which still have Wuthering Heights banned, but society should ask; why is it …show more content…
Earnshaw, Hindley returned to home and banished Heathcliff to the stables, turning him into a slave rather than embracing him with love like his father had done. The love of a parent, whether or not it is natural born or chosen, is the beginning of the story that turned twisted as the three children grew into adulthood and had their own respective families. The only paternal love that survived was that of Catherine’s daughter through her husband Edgar Linton, for their daughter Cathy. Although there are many different love stories within the pages of Wuthering Heights, the passion and love between Heathcliff and Catherine is what makes up the stories plot. One of the memorable passages to sum up Catherine’s thoughts on love between herself, Edgar, and Heathcliff are scattered through IX of Bronte’s novel of Wuthering Heights.
“‘.—My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I’m well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He’s always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being. So don’t talk of our separation again: it is impracticable; and—’ Bronte has the gift of being able to use her vivid imagination and separate true love from superficial love specifically within each character. Catherine’s love for Edgar is indeed superficial

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